N7502 Radio Rd.  - Ripon WI 54971 Phone:  920.748.5111 or 888-478-WRPN

Last Updated:  October 31st 9:00a.m.

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AM 1600 WRPN
N7502 Radio Rd.
Ripon WI 54971
P:  920.748.5111
F:  920.748.5530

WAUPUN STATE PRISON DEATH INVESTIGATION CLOSED; RULED UNFOUNDED

Dodge County authorities say they can not find evidence that an inmate at the state prison in Waupun died under suspicious circumstances in the 1960's. Sheriff's deputies received a complaint in June about an unnamed prisoner's body that was said to be placed on top of another body in a cemetery.  Last week, officers pulled back topsoil in the area -- but they did not open any graves, and they found nothing out of line.  Also, both Dodge County and state workers searched a host of records to try and identify the inmate -- but they could not identify the person.  With the lack of evidence, authorities now say the death investigation is closed, and is officially unfounded.

BIDDING TO START AT $7.5 MILLION FOR PAPER VALLEY HOTEL

An online listing says the starting bid for the Radisson Paper Valley Hotel in Appleton is $7.5 million.  An auction for the 388-room downtown hotel begins Dec. 1 and ends Dec. 3.  The city has been talking with the hotel investors about plans for a $27 million Fox Cities Exhibition Center. Hotel general manager Jay Schumerth says the exhibition center is a priority for the Paper Valley Hotel because it will mean many more visitors for the area.  Schumerth says the Paper Valley was built in 1982 and has more than 38,000 square feet of meeting and banquet space and includes the Vince Lombardi Steakhouse.

MAN LIES ABOUT FINDING ABANDONED DOGS IN DODGE COUNTY

The Dodge County Humane Society says a man who brought two neglected dogs to an animal shelter in Beaver Dam was lying when he said he found them abandoned.  According to Humane Society president Ryan Vossekuil, the man claimed he found the small dogs in a Dumpster behind a grocery store this week.  However, when police investigated the possibility of animal neglect, they said the man eventually admitted he got the dogs from a relative.  Vossekuil says the two pets should be ready by next week for somebody to adopt them.  They're an eight-year-old Lhaso Apso named Lucky, and a two-year-old poodle-Shih Tzu mix named Chance.

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Here are the details:

Local property assessors who don't meet uniform standards could be punished by the state under a new bill considered for next year.  Assembly Republican Samantha Kerkman of Salem is working on a bill to let the Revenue Department suspend an assessor's state certification for up to a year. That's after the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel found that assessments in some Wisconsin areas are so out of whack, that up to 20-percent of total property taxes are being paid by the wrong people.  Right now, the state can only revoke certifications for misconduct, negligence, or incompetence -- and no assessor has been revoked for at least the last decade.  State law requires properties to be assessed uniformly for tax purposes.  Kerkman's bill would limit the number of years a community's assessment roll can be out of compliance from seven years to six, before the state can order a supervised re-valuation.  Municipalities are considered to be out of compliance when a major class of property -- like homes or businesses -- are assessed 10-percent higher or lower than their total market values.  Assessors say the ideal situation is to re-assess communities each year -- but that's expensive, and many cash-strapped local governments have hesitated to do it.  Kerkman, who's unopposed in Tuesday's election, said she tried pressing the issue almost a year ago but it never went anywhere.

-10/30-

Governor Scott Walker says the news media should have done a better job of profiling his Democratic opponent Mary Burke.  At a campaign stop in Sheboygan yesterday, the Republican Walker said it wasn't him who planted this week's claims that Burke was fired from her family's Trek Bicycle business in 1993.  Walker said he heard rumors for months that Burke was terminated as the head of Trek's overseas operations -- but he did not believe it was up to him to bring it up.  He blamed the media for not vetting Burke properly, and he told reporters -- "You covered the bald spot in my head more than you've covered my opponent."  Two former Trek executives went to the media this week to say Burke was fired for low sales -- but Burke and her brother John, the current head of Trek Bicycle, said Burke left voluntarily in a company re-organization. They also said sales rose dramatically under Mary's watch, and she blamed Walker for pushing what she called "complete lies."  Campaigning in Port Washington yesterday, Burke said she believed the race is closer than what this week's Marquette poll showed.  It said Walker pulled out to a seven-point lead after more Republicans said recently that they would vote on Tuesday.  State officials predict a 56-and-a-half percent turnout.  

-10/30-

A Wisconsin Rapids man will spend the rest of his life in prison for killing his daughter's ex-boyfriend six years ago.  Fifty-year-old Joseph Reinwand was convicted yesterday of first-degree intentional homicide in the shooting death of 35-year-old Dale Meister.  A jury brought in from Waushara County deliberated almost two hours before handing down the verdict.  About an hour later, Wood County Circuit Judge Greg Potter sentenced Reinwand to life with no chance for a supervised release.  He's already in prison for unrelated charges that include identity theft -- and he faces a trial next summer in Portage County, after authorities cited new evidence that Reinwand caused the death of his wife Pamela 30 years ago.  Authorities said Meister was killed after a lengthy custody dispute between him and his wife over Reinwand's grand-daughter.  In yesterday's closing arguments, prosecutors said Reinwand was manipulative and deceptive.  The defense said authorities should have considered other possible suspects and didn't.